All posts tagged: Featured

Intellectual Property Law Society | Student Organization Voices Series

Your Name: Catherine Cuff Graduation Year: May 2020 Name of Organization: Intellectual Property Law Society (IPLS) Position in Organization: President Temple Law School: When did you join this organization? Catherine Cuff: I joined IPLS as a 1L my first year at Temple. I worked in IT prior to law school and knew I was interested in the subject. I made sure to sign up at the student activities fair. TLS: Why did you decide to join this group? CC: With our society relying more and more on technology I wanted to better understand how law and science interact. I also wanted to demonstrate to employers that this was an area of interest for me. Embarrassingly, I’ve always had a bunch of crazy ideas for inventions. I wanted to learn how to make them reality! TLS: What is your organization’s mission? CC: The purpose of IPLS is to promote the discussion of legal challenge presented by technological advances through speakers and events. We want to connect students with this wonderful field of law! TLS: Can you …

Washington Square West | My Philly Neighborhood

I live in a one bedroom and one bathroom apartment in Washington Square West. I found my apartment on Craigslist. It has a full kitchen, living room, bedroom, and backyard. Washington Square West is a fantastic place to live. The neighborhood is residential, filled with historic brownstones, and brimming with personality. It is surrounded by other great neighborhoods, like Bella Vista, Queen Village, the Gayborhood, and Center City. I love this neighborhood because of the food and location. I’m two blocks from Acme and Whole Foods on South Street. I am surrounded by great restaurants. To name a few: Crybaby Pasta, Angelo’s Pizzeria, Little Italy, Little Nonna’s, Emmy Squared, Nomad, Woodrow’s Sandwich Shop, and BAP. They’re all so good! Bon Apetit ranked the cheesesteak from Woodrow’s as the third best one in the city. You seriously have to try it! The neighborhood is within walking distance to other great places, like Queen Village, Center City, Old City, Bella Vista, Fitler Square, you name it. I’m close to the best parts of the city, but far …

The Family Law Society | Student Organization Voices Series

Your Name: Erin Ambrose Graduation Year: May 2021 Name of Organization: The Family Law Society Position in Organization: President Temple Law School: When did you join this organization? Erin Ambrose: I joined the Family Law Society as a 1L at the student organization fair! TLS: Why did you decide to join this group? EA: I decided to join this organization because it is an area of law that I am interested in practicing. I knew that the organization worked with the Family Law Section of the Pennsylvania Bar Association so there would be great opportunities to network as well as learn more about this subject area. TLS: What is your organization’s mission? EA: Our goal as the Family Law Society at Temple is to increase family law awareness and allow students to explore family law opportunities. We want students at the law school to gain a deeper understanding of the various aspects of family law by hearing guest speakers, panel discussions, and attending networking events. We will also aim to raise awareness of the expansive …

My Philly Neighborhood: Passyunk Square in South Philadelphia

When I’m not in class or studying in the law school library, I am enjoying time in my South Philadelphia neighborhood. My brother has lived in Passyunk Square in South Philadelphia for years and suggested I look for housing in the area. I quickly found my apartment on the real estate website, Zillow. I live on my own in a one-bedroom apartment and rent is around $1,600 per month. I chose to live in Passyunk Square because it’s charming, safe, and an easy commute to school. Each morning I walk 5 minutes to the Ellsworth-Federal station and ride the Broad Street Line (BSL) to Temple’s Cecil B. Moore station. The entire commute is around 20 minutes. It was important to me to live in a neighborhood near the BSL so that I don’t have to transfer between subway lines or trolleys to get to school. Living near the BSL also makes it easy to get to shopping and dining in Center City, though I often walk. There is a lot within walking distance in Passyunk …

School Discipline Advocacy Service | Student Organization Voices Series

Your Name: Araesia King Graduation Year: May 2021 Name of Organization: School Discipline Advocacy Service (SDAS) Position in Organization: Program Director   TLS: When did you join this organization? AK: I joined SDAS as 1L last year. Getting involved with SDAS was actually one of the reasons why I was excited about coming to Temple. I knew that I was interested in education law and this organization is a great way to learn the basics. I had looked up the program before coming to the school and made sure to sign up at the student activities fair. TLS: Why did you decide to join this group? AK: I chose to get involved with SDAS because it is a great way to interact with the community that I hope to work with in the future (students in the public school system and their families). I also was looking for a way to do some community service during my time here at Temple. TLS: What is your organization’s mission? AK: The organization operates in three schools in …

Teaching, Engaging, Achieving, and Motivating

“Lift as you climb.” As I embark on various endeavors and gain knowledge, skills, and experiences, I feel morally obligated to use the resources I have acquired to help others progress and succeed. Throughout my undergraduate education and law school, I have become keenly aware of the lack of diversity and inclusion in the legal profession.  Specifically, there is a shortage of African-American attorneys and few African Americans and minorities in leadership roles within firms, companies, and organizations nationwide.  One way to address this issue is through opportunity and exposure. Since 2015, I have created five educational programs for minority students. The majority of my programs were created and implemented for students in the Greater Philadelphia area.  My latest initiative is the Teaching; Engaging; Achieving; Motivating program (T.E.A.M.), which I facilitated in Willingboro, New Jersey. T.E.A.M. was launched in January 2019 for 50 middle schoolers in Willingboro, NJ. The 14-week program consisted of 60-minute sessions held on Friday mornings at Memorial Middle School.  Students learned basic criminal law and criminal procedure including Miranda rights, police …

The Lessons We Future Lawyers Should Learn From the Life of Nipsey Hussle

During his 33 years of life, Ermias Joseph Asghedom (pronounced “Air-me-yaahs” and “Ahs-ged-om”), also known as “Nipsey Hussle,” was an ambitious and virtuous man who inspired millions to never give up, achieve their dreams and give back to their community. For those of you who have never heard of Asghedom, or only learned about him in the last week since his untimely death, please allow me to introduce him to you before I highlight some lessons we future lawyers should learn from Asghedom’s life. Asghedom was born in Los Angeles in 1985 to an Eritrean father (Dawit Asghedom) and an African-American mother (Angelique Smith) and raised in the Crenshaw neighborhood of South Los Angeles. As a youth growing up in the rough world of South LA, Asghedom joined the “Rollin 60’s” Neighborhood Crips gang. Despite his affiliation with the Rollin 60’s in his early years, Asghedom knew early on that he wanted to transition out of the gangster life and into one where he could become a musical artist and entrepreneur. Fortunately, Asghedom was able …

Learning to Ask

I don’t even know what I don’t know. This was my mantra my entire 1LE year… and maybe even for a few of my 2LE classes. Law school is essentially a process to break down and rebuild the way you think and analyze information. As a 1LE, one of the first things you do is to spend hours pouring over the Bluebook, the citation reference guide for legal writing, trying to figure out how to cite cases that you hope are applicable to the paper you are writing. You also spend hours reading lengthy, wordy, Scalia dissents that have no bearing on the major takeaways from the case you’re reading, but that will be helpful to know down the line. More than likely, you are also in the throes of trying to figure out the different elements of ‘negligence’ and why a word that once seemed so simple, suddenly seems so complex. There’s also the added pressure to know those elements before Monday, because you’re on call and will need to answer questions in front …

My Philly Neighborhood: Commuting from the Suburbs

I grew up in the Philadelphia suburbs, but was always drawn to the city itself. When I enrolled in Temple Law, I was excited to throw myself entirely into city life. I thought that during my time at Temple Law, it was essential for me to live in the geographic boundaries of Philadelphia. However, I quickly realized that this was not the case. Living in the suburbs as a Temple Law student is actually a very real possibility. We all know that law school can be expensive, and for me, living in the suburbs was a way to offset some of that expense. Luckily for me, my parents still live in the same suburb where I grew up and were willing to have me move back home after years of living on my own. As a current third-year law student, I commute to Temple Law every day using Septa’s Regional Rail System. The Regional Rail has trains that run from Philadelphia to the western suburbs, northern suburbs, and even New Jersey. I take the Paoli-Thorndale …

Coming Full Circle Through Guided Research

During an undergraduate course on race in the United States, I was tasked with interviewing someone who identified as a “hyphenated American” to discuss this person’s experiences as nonwhite in America. I decided to interview my grandfather, a Mexican-American man who grew up in the American Southwest. While I was aware that all of my grandparents had faced some form of discrimination in their lives because of their Mexican ancestry, this exercise gave me a chance to learn more details about my grandfather’s experiences and contextualize those experiences with historical perspective. As that class ended, I knew that I wanted to continue to dive deeper into the history of Mexican-American people and other Latinx folks, and decided that I should double major in Chicano/Latino Studies. That decision completely changed the trajectory of my education. From that point forward, I viewed my political science studies through a new lens, analyzing the intersection of political systems and low-income minority populations. For most of my life I thought that the hardships my grandparents faced were those of a …