All posts filed under: Trending

“The Cart Before the Horse” – A Kenyan Court Just Quashed a USD 95M Biometric Digital ID Project

The case is a watershed moment in the regulation of data-driven public sector initiatives The Context: A Global Biometric Identification Industry Digital technologies dominate decisions about the future of public infrastructures like civil registration and electoral systems, social assistance, and banking. The prospect of digital transformation in these sectors stokes optimism in emerging economies and receives ample support from influential international development and foreign aid institutions like the Inter-American Development Bank, the European Union, and the World Bank. In the case of digital identification systems (digital ID), the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, specifically Target 16.9 which obliges governments to “provide legal identity for all,” unleashed a tidal wave of global investment (from wealthy economies). Those investments are tied to the untested assumption that there is a rough equivalence between a digital ID, and legal identity, which is anchored in the human right to recognition as a person before the law. The actual integration of human rights and development languishes far behind the implementation of these technologies, but further investment in understanding and mitigating the human …

Passing the California Bar Exam

I enrolled in LL.M. in U.S. Law in May, 2015 aiming to become a competent lawyer who can discuss legal matters on an equal basis with U.S. lawyers working for a U.S. affiliate. Due to increased opportunities to collaborate and work with foreign lawyers, I became aware that obtaining knowledge about U.S law was essential to pursue my career as a legal professional in the long run. The learning environment at TUJ was ideal for me because the lectures were mostly scheduled for evening, which allowed me to learn at TUJ and earn LL.M. while working full-time without leaving Japan. Although I planned to manage both work and study, in reality, especially at the beginning I spent a large amount of time for extensive reading required for each class, which sometimes challenged me in balancing among work, study and life. Despite the busy days, I always looked forward to attending live classes and enjoyed learning U.S. laws and cases. The live classes at TUJ greatly helped me understand the principles of U.S. laws and enabled …

Graphic of a globe with interconnected bubbles with cartoons of various people and practitioners to exemplify World Health Day

A Decade of Public Health Legal Education

Law is the primary social tool used to influence behaviors and environments — for “generalizing or scaling up practices judged collectively beneficial, forestalling negative behavior, and setting powers, duties, and limitations on public and private entities.” As researchers, policymakers, advocates and others seek to better understand how and why legal interventions make a difference to the public’s health, public health legal education stands as a crucial component in the capacity building necessary for rigorous and rapid evaluation of these legal interventions that “treat” millions of people. That evaluation — called public health law research, or legal epidemiology research — supports evidence-based policy- and decision-making that can advance health, improve well-being, and increase equity not only in the United States, but around the world. For nearly 12 years, the Center for Public Health Law Research at the Beasley School of Law has been dedicated to that capacity building through our work developing research methods for legal epidemiology, like policy surveillance (which is the systematic, scientific tracking of laws of public health significance); funding research projects with …

Center of Compliance and Ethics brochures on a deck

Ethics Awareness Month

March, which marks Ethics Awareness Month, gave us at the Center for Compliance and Ethics the opportunity to reflect on the importance of organizational ethics. Unethical behavior damages organizational reputations, lowers employee morale, and erodes public trust. Effective compliance and ethics programs built on an ethical culture and led by compliance and ethics officers are essential to the success of any organization. The role of a compliance and ethics officer today is interesting and complex, necessitating an understanding of law and regulatory expectations, the drivers of organizational culture and individual behavior, and the ability to grasp evolving business strategies.  Compliance and ethics is also a rapidly growing profession, projected to increase in the U.S. alone by 4.6 percent between 2019 and 2029. In recognition of these trends, Temple Law established the Center for Compliance and Ethics in 2015 with the goal of improving the understanding and practice of compliance and ethics across disciplines, industries, and sectors.  The Center o­ffers a comprehensive compliance and ethics curriculum, experiential learning opportunities, and summer fellowships to students and executive …

Reflections on AIDS Awareness Month and the Case for Public Health Law Research

As we observe AIDS Awareness month this December, we find ourselves looking back on the most challenging year from a public health perspective in at least a century. The current pandemic places all of us at the direct crossroads of public policy and public health in a daily reality unrivaled in most of our previous experience. Thinking about the impact of school and business closures, restrictions on gatherings and travel, mask mandates, and how to distribute vaccines highlight just a few of the law and policy responses we now interact with to keep ourselves and each other safe. As we pause each year to recognize those living with HIV, and remember those lost to AIDS, the condition caused by the virus, we must also remember that we suffer many of those losses, especially the early ones, because of the original failures of the public health response to the HIV epidemic. These failures included but are not limited to a minimization of the government’s role in public health response and related delays to address the spread …

Temple Law Reacts to the June Medical Services, LLC v. Russo SCOTUS Decision

On June 29, 2020, Supreme Court Justice Breyer delivered the 5-4 opinion in June Medical Services, LLC v. Russo, holding that Louisiana’s Unsafe Abortion Protection Act, requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, is unconstitutional. Rachel Rebouché Associate Dean for Research Professor of Law Generally, this is a win for abortion supporters, and a decision many did not expect. Justice Breyer relied heavily on the factual record developed by the District Court and ruled that the law was the same in its effect and purpose as the Texas law struck down in 2016. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote a concurrence, ruling on grounds of stare decisis and providing the 5th vote needed to strike down the restriction. His concurrence is quite narrow, though, and it suggests that the Chief Justice interprets prior caselaw as giving far more deference to states than the Court’s 2016 ruling did. Adrienne R. Ghorashi, Esq. Program Manager Center for Public Health Law Research This SCOTUS decision reaffirms what was already established 4 years ago …

Top Gun XI Trial Advocacy Competition | A Q&A with Eric Love LAW ’20 and Lauren Doig LAW ’21

The below is excerpted from conversation held about a week after Eric Love competed in the Top Gun XI Trial Advocacy competition. Eric was supported by his second chair, Lauren Doig, and his coach, Professor Sara Jacobson. Top Gun is a unique tournament, giving only 24 hours to prepare before a lone advocate tries both the plaintiff and defense side of the case. This competition was also unique because it was the first full mock trial tournament conducted wholly online. It was conducted one week after George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis as a weekend of protests and unrest swept the country. Eric and Lauren won the professionalism award for the tournament for the issues they faced during the final round. Eric, Lauren, and Professor Jacobson were working out of a rented apartment suite on the 7th floor at 15th and Chestnut. Eric’s final round began about 4pm. He and Lauren were unaware that blocks away, civil protest had turned to civil unrest at Philadelphia’s City Hall and that looting, small fires, and …

Running for State Representative – Q&A with Maggie Borski and Nick Elia

At Temple Law, students don’t wait for graduation to start chasing their dreams and building their careers. Currently a third-year law student, Maggie Borski is running to represent the 177th District in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. She and her campaign manager, fellow 3L Nick Elia, sat down with Temple Law for a Q&A last month during finals to share their experiences so far. Temple Law: What made you decide that you wanted to run for district representative? Maggie Borski: I actually did an internship with State Representative Donna Bullock last spring and it was wonderful. I got to know her pretty well, and her staff. I had mentioned to her that, maybe down the line, pursuing public service, public office, would be something I’d be interested in. When the semester began, literally the second week of classes, I get a Facebook message from Donna and it was an article saying my representative, John Taylor, was not seeking reelection. It was kind of like a light bulb went off, you know, if there’s ever a …