Providing Philadelphia with Legislative Authority Over Guns

Patrick Zancolli JD Anticipated May 2023, Law & Public Policy Scholar In the last two weeks, two young men were shot and killed around the Temple University campus in North Philadelphia. The first victim was an eighteen-year old member of the North Philadelphia community, and the second was a Temple University senior. While these regrettable incidences of gun violence may have hit closer to home than others that have occurred this year, they must be squared within a larger backdrop. …

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A Meditation on Angst and Assurance

Paul Loriston, JD Anticipated May 2022, Law & Public Policy Scholar One evening during my senior year of college I was catching up with friends from the old neighborhood and explaining what I was doing in college. It was in the middle of explaining these lofty concepts that I picked up while earning my degree in economics that I was struck by how little this degree had anything to do with my life. Not the life I was still working …

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A Farewell to Rational Aims: Why U.S. Strategy Failed in Afghanistan

Peter Konchak ’21, Law & Public Policy Scholar             August 30, 2021 marked the end of nearly two decades of continuous U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan. A little more than two weeks after Taliban militants seized the Afghan capital, Kabul, following a rapid offensive and the wholesale collapse of the Afghan security forces, the last U.S. military forces in Afghanistan completed their ignominious withdrawal from that country. As a consequence, to the extent that the war in Afghanistan constituted a …

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Rethinking Coastal Adaptation in the Age of Climate Change

Kate Steiker-Ginzberg, JD Anticipated May 2022 For years, I’ve been fortunate to enjoy the quaint Long Beach Island home that has been the summertime retreat of my friend Rebecca’s family since the 1950s. Beach Haven, New Jersey, has changed dramatically since her father Steve was growing up. Since the 1980s, developers have been replacing bungalows and empty lots with mega-mansions, each with a roof deck higher than the last. Even after Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on the New Jersey coastline, …

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Systemic Racism as a Crime Against Humanity: Explaining the Contextual Elements

Kathleen Killian ’21, Law & Public Policy Scholar The following is the first part in a series on systemic racism in the United States and the manner in which it implicates several crimes against humanity under international criminal law. The United States has, while flouting its reputation as the “land of the free,” has continued to implement government policies that furthers the systemic oppression of Black Americans. Although civil rights advocates in the country have achieved milestones for equality, the …

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The Paris Agreement: Our Best Shot at a Habitable Earth

Benjamin Whitney, JD Anticipated May 2022 Among President Biden’s very first acts as the nation’s forty-sixth chief executive was to recommit the United States to the Paris Climate Agreement (Paris). This move comes after the United States’ four-year absence from that international agreement under the Trump Administration. Paris is a watershed multilateral-treaty that brings together 196 adopting nations for one common, fundamental goal––limiting global warming to “well below 2ºC and preferably to 1.5ºC.” The treaty, notwithstanding the temporary absence of …

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Ukraine Shows the Way Forward on Combating Disinformation

Alexander Rojavin ’20, Law & Public Policy Scholar On April 5, Ukraine’s new Center for Countering Disinformation officially came online. Framed by its inaugural director Polina Lysenko as aiming to “to counteract propaganda, destructive disinformation and campaigns, as well as to prevent manipulation of public opinion,” the Center is designed to be a flagship of the Zelensky administration’s counter-disinformation efforts. The administration has every reason to hope for the Center’s success, and if it is indeed successful, the resulting benefits …

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Climate Change Is Politically Polarizing, but Science Communication Studies Suggest It Doesn’t Have to Be

Peter Limburg, JD Anticipated May 2022 Climate change is now more politically polarizing than any issue in American public discourse. In a recent poll from Yale University, American voters were asked to order topics by how important they were to their voting decision in the 2020 presidential election. For liberal Democrats, climate change came third in importance. For conservative Republicans, climate change ranked dead last, in the 29th slot. But it is important to note that global warming was not …

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5G + AI: Will the Powerful Duo Come at the Expense of U.S. Consumer Privacy?

Sultan-Mahmood Seraj, Law & Public Policy Scholar, JD Anticipated May 2021 The rapid growth of 5th Generation (5G) telecommunication networks and technology is revolutionizing global communication capabilities. The emergence of 5G wireless communication will allow for more connected devices to transmit data at far higher speeds than previously possible. These qualities make 5G transformative, as the technology can be used to accelerate the already rapid growth of Internet of Things (IoT) devices and the development of smart cities, fully autonomous …

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Disinformation and Polarization: The Other Pandemic

Alexander Rojavin ’20, Law & Public Policy Scholar President Biden assumes leadership of a nation facing a murderer’s row of crises, most of which he identified in a clear-eyed manner at his inauguration: an only-worsening pandemic, “growing inequity,” systems grappling with a legacy of discrimination, a suffering economy, a faltering education system, and a global arena that has spent four years without a particularly involved America. But President Biden also acknowledged that foremost among these, the most insidious crisis underlying, …

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